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Discussion Starter #1
Well, she's been sitting like this for the last 5 years. Got sidetracked building the 85 4Runner. Had the frame sandblasted then put a few hours (about 40) into treating it with POR-15.
Hoepfully this year I'll be able to get back to working on her.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Forgot to add the photo!
77 LC FJ40
4" lift
35x15.5 SX's
 

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Bob1, this may be a dumb question, but is that just POR15 on your frame & axles, or is there paint on top of the POR15. Just curious, as plan on starting a resto after my drivetrain transplant.

TIA, Robby.
 

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Cisco-that's just POR on the frame, no top coat. I used the high gloss instead of the flat. When I first used it they were having problems with the flat staying uniform in color. They suggested using the high gloss for a more uniform appearance. Overall I'm very happy with it. Would I do it again? No, not for a trail truck (like that will ever make it out of the garage!). For a trail truck I'd just stick with good old rustoleom, or whatever's on sale.

As for the 4Runner, here she is on her maiden voyage...

 

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Bob, I appreciate your response. I think I'm going to use the POR15 b/c of the way it seals the metal to keep rust at bay. Your chassis looks good. Maybe we'll see some pics of your finished FJ40 in the future. As for now, that 4runner looks like it would be fun to wheel.
 

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Cisco, I must add that my 40 frame was professionally sandblasted, inside and out to remove every scale of rust. Remember, I said I had a good 40 hours in the frame alone. The process is very difficult to work with and must be performed as specified or it won't come out right. This took a long time and quite a few bucks. Between the sandblaster and the POR process I'm into it for an easy $500. This goes right down to the paintbrushes used. Don't even think you can reuse a paintbrush the next day. Buy cheap brushes, forget the sponge things. Buy at least two gallons of metal ready and another two gallons of degreaser. The treated part must be thoroughly degreased or the process is a waist of time and money. This is why I sandblasted to get the heavy stuff off and to make degreasing easier. I degreased the whole thing with brake cleaner (a whole case) then degreased again with regular degreaser. Then I washed it down and rerinsed it again the next day before the next step. Using the metal ready is also a pain, you must make sure that the area your applying it to doesn't dry or you have to start over, they suggest keeping it wet for 15 minutes for the etching process to take, I suggest 20-25 at the least. The only way I found to do it right was to buy two gallons of the Metal Ready and a pressurized sprayer from Home Cheapo, the kind you put insecticide or weed killer in. Add some Metal Ready, pump it up and walk around the truck for the next half hour soaking the frame inside and out. If it dries it leaves a white residue that the apint will flake off of. After doing this you have to again wash it down. I washed by hand then rinsed for 20 minutes, then rerinsed the next day. So your now into it for 3 or 4 days if your as anal as I am. Now comes the fun part, the paint.
Use cheap disposeable brushed. Buy small amounts of POR 15 paint, I found that getting the 6 packs was easiest. This stuff dries fast and becomes thick as mollasses if not applied right away. Don't even think your gonna paint, then cap your quart of paint and be able to reopen it the next day. Use the small jars and store the rest in the fridge. Have fun trying to get the inside of the frame rails too. Useless to just do the outside of the frame in my opinion. I tried long brushes and even tried tying a sponge cut to the size of the inside of the frame to a long string. I soaked the sponge in paint thinking I could pull it along the inside of the rails and it would coat the inside, NOT! Had to figure out ingenious ways to poke, prod and jam stuff into the frame and access holes to cover every inch. Didn't have a compressor to spray it in, plus if you get any condensation in the mix when you paint, it's useless.
So what am I saying? Save your money and buy a case of rustoleum!
 

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I have thought many times that I would never finish mine, still haven't, but keep at it and you will...or you won't and your a slap ass.:flipoff2:
 

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Bob1 said:
Cisco, I must add that my 40 frame was professionally sandblasted, inside and out to remove every scale of rust. .
.
.
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So what am I saying? Save your money and buy a case of rustoleum!
Wow.. That's a LOT of work. Is this a show truck?



When I had my frame out, I painted it with grey primer. I have no idea what the hell I was thinking. Really dumb. Should have used Rustoleum Black Semi-Gloss.

You can spray that shit over dirt, caked on grease, rust, other paint, bondo, whatever, and it always looks OK. Not great, not terrible. I use it exclusively now. When enough flakes off a part to warrant a repaint, I hit it with the pressure washer, let dry and reshoot.
 

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Bob1 said:
Cisco, I must add that my 40 frame was professionally sandblasted, inside and out to remove every scale of rust. Remember, I said I had a good 40 hours in the frame alone. The process is very difficult to work with and must be performed as specified or it won't come out right. This took a long time and quite a few bucks. Between the sandblaster and the POR process I'm into it for an easy $500. This goes right down to the paintbrushes used. Don't even think you can reuse a paintbrush the next day. Buy cheap brushes, forget the sponge things. Buy at least two gallons of metal ready and another two gallons of degreaser. The treated part must be thoroughly degreased or the process is a waist of time and money. This is why I sandblasted to get the heavy stuff off and to make degreasing easier. I degreased the whole thing with brake cleaner (a whole case) then degreased again with regular degreaser. Then I washed it down and rerinsed it again the next day before the next step. Using the metal ready is also a pain, you must make sure that the area your applying it to doesn't dry or you have to start over, they suggest keeping it wet for 15 minutes for the etching process to take, I suggest 20-25 at the least. The only way I found to do it right was to buy two gallons of the Metal Ready and a pressurized sprayer from Home Cheapo, the kind you put insecticide or weed killer in. Add some Metal Ready, pump it up and walk around the truck for the next half hour soaking the frame inside and out. If it dries it leaves a white residue that the apint will flake off of. After doing this you have to again wash it down. I washed by hand then rinsed for 20 minutes, then rerinsed the next day. So your now into it for 3 or 4 days if your as anal as I am. Now comes the fun part, the paint.
Use cheap disposeable brushed. Buy small amounts of POR 15 paint, I found that getting the 6 packs was easiest. This stuff dries fast and becomes thick as mollasses if not applied right away. Don't even think your gonna paint, then cap your quart of paint and be able to reopen it the next day. Use the small jars and store the rest in the fridge. Have fun trying to get the inside of the frame rails too. Useless to just do the outside of the frame in my opinion. I tried long brushes and even tried tying a sponge cut to the size of the inside of the frame to a long string. I soaked the sponge in paint thinking I could pull it along the inside of the rails and it would coat the inside, NOT! Had to figure out ingenious ways to poke, prod and jam stuff into the frame and access holes to cover every inch. Didn't have a compressor to spray it in, plus if you get any condensation in the mix when you paint, it's useless.
So what am I saying? Save your money and buy a case of rustoleum!
HOLY CRAP!!! Thanks for the info. I thought it sounded like an involved process before I read this, but now I'm beginning to think it sounds absurd. As OCD as I am, I would probably go nuts trying to get the whole frame done.
Bob, what about using a paint gun to put the stuff on? Is that possible, without destroying the gun?
 

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All I can say about POR-15 is just 'Wow'! What stops you now from finishing your 'Cruiser?

As for me I've been temped to sell everything and give up. When I was in college I owned '74 FJ40, paid money to some guys to put it in Chevy 305 with SM-420 and 3 spd. Toy t-case but the motor was worn out - always had ingtion troubles and finally I spun a rod. That I never had enough money to fix it and I didn't have any experience/tools.

Anyway, now it's 4th year and I cannot finish my current 'Cruiser - it's an '81 stock Diesel BJ44 import from Japan, half way converted to left hand steering now. The 4th year! and the thing is pretty much just a frame with axles and motor with tranny. Job and now going to some college again kept me busy, then from May till September of 2003 I had no electricity in my the garage I was renting, 2 years ago I crashed my old BMW daily driver into a Lexus LS400 - I was not insured, had to borrow money and pay off for Lexus damages. Most of my friends make joke about me that I'll never finish it. Then I bought a trashed 1981 BMW as a basic transportation and I got side tracked - I have to admit - spent several months doing motor rebuild and some other fix ups on it.

Now, I am desperate to finish my 'Cruiser by May 2004. Gotta solve ring & pinion and locker dillema and I am on my way to turn key solution.

Cheers,
Andrey
 

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I have used the POR 15 several times. Sandblasted surfaces didn't adhere as well as the rusted ones. That assumes the scale and heavy crud is wire brushed off.

If I was to sandblast an item that would be coated with POR 15, I would mist it with water (from a spray bottle) and let it surface rust before applying. Prep is the key to this stuff working, and their web site makes it clear it's intended purpose, and how to get good results.

Secondly, all POR15 products will fade from UV light. Even your mostly covered frame will look dingy in those areas that see daylight. Specifically the end frame rails, and any bumpers you choose to coat as well. Topcoating will give you a much better result.

Having said all that, if I had a completely pro sandblasted frame to start with, I wouldn't use POR 15. There are many products that will protect against future rust concerns, much better. For the $$$ and time, a professional painter can apply an epoxy system, bake it on.

I also found that the cheap brushes shed the bristles way to easily. So if you are looking for a smooth finish without foreign matter, buy the better brushes and work the bristles before ya put paint on them. The sponges work ok, just don't try and save money by buying the cheapest ones.

No matter how much protection you use to keep POR off of you, it won't be enough! Be sure to clean the stuff off your skin as quickly as possible with solvent.
 

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Spaceghost, that is encouraging. I will probably still try my hand at the POR15, I hadn't planned to competely strip the chassis to bare metal. I may sandblast the body, but not the chassis.
 

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I'll second most of what has been said by Bob1 and SpaceGhost about POR. We used it on the frame of our Pig, which is not a show truck, and not really a trail rig, but I wanted to treat it right and hopefully not have to worry about rust for a loooong time.

I considered galvanizing, powdercoating, Rustoleum or other paints. I decided against galvanizing and powdercoating because I knew I would eventually end up welding or modifying the frame in some way and there would be no way to perform spot repairs to either of those finishes to my satisfaction. Rustoleum might have been a good choice, but I liked the (advertised) durability of POR. If I were buidling a trail rig, I'm don't think I would have gone to the expense of using POR... definitley Rustoleum.

We sandblasted the frame, let it rust, thoroughly cleaned and degreased it, rinsed it forever, used rediculous amounts of metal ready, rinsed it forever again, then used 2 coats of POR with lots of cheap brushes, followed by POR Chassis Black. To coat the inside, I used one of those fluffy synthetic duster things (looks like a large pshychadelic Tribble) on the end of a long stick.

I also used POR on the underside of the body and in the engine compartment. In the engine compartment, I followed the POR with Topcoat primer and Dupont urethane Cygnus white. Under the body I covered the POR with 3M Budy Schutz undercoating.

So far I am extremely pleased with the durability and finish... but its really only been back on the road for less than a year. Time will tell how well it holds up. I've used Rustoleum on my skid plates and some other odd parts underneath, so I'll get to see how well it lasts compared to the POR.

:fj:
 

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Oh no another Opinion!!!

When sandblasting for a show type finish you first need it blasted complete in and out to a level of white metal. Powder coating is kinda cool since there is electrical charge which attracts the powder to the frame. It can wrap around corners as its sprayed like a magnet to metal.

If we are asked to powder coat the axles they have to be hot tanked to suck all the oil out of the meta or it bleeds through the powdercoating when back and ruins the finish.

Spring powdercoat very well and the stuff is supper flexable, I originally thought it to be very hard rigid product.

It never will 100% coat the inside of the frame rails, this is is were a four foot wond with several pin holes spray in a circle. You put the flexiable wond down the frame rails and spray whatever your choice of product as you pull the wond out.. It does the best job of coating all four sides of the frame interior.

If we do the Expoxy coating as we are on our current work then its much simpler and IMO the most cost effective way to handle a project of any cost, plus it looks just as good as the powder coating.

Cost when subbed out.

Sand blast and powder coat Cost 1600.00 Canadian
Sand blast and expoxy coat Coast 800.00 Canadian

Rob
Radd Crusiers
 
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