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Discussion Starter #1
Got my hands on 4 free BFG km1 tyres on 35", half inch thread left, but found out they are leaking a bit. Cleanned the rims and fit new valves but the problem remains.
I believe the thread must be porous because they leak all the same in the same timespan, so, will a tyre sealant like slime be usefull in this case?
Thanks.
 

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Will Slime type tyre sealant fix porous old 35" bfg km1's ?

I've used "slime" extensively in mountain biking. It is superior to tubes. It allows the tire to still conform to obstacles where a tube restricts that somewhat, and generally weighs much less. Slime will also seal small punctures spontaneously.

I've used Stans sealant in the past but now use orange seal, which is much better (it stays liquid in the tube longer, thus will seal punctures longer). Sealants require a few days to set up properly, as they "coat" the inside of the tire where small leaks are occurring. If you know there are many or large leaks, you will need a lot of sealant. A half cup is a lot for a mountain bike tire but a Jeep tire probably needs a quart or two.

If there are others that have used it in Jeeps maybe they'll chime in. The thought has certainly occurred to me as Jeep and mountain bikes tires have a lot in common but I'm a bit new to Jeeping at this point.

To set it up, fill the tire or tires by pulling the valve stems and pouring sealant through the valve. Replace the stem and air up. Then go for a drive to spin the sealant out to all edges. Let it sit for a bit (it might lose some air early on, just air back up) and periodically drive it for ~5 minutes. Within 24 hours after 4-5 of these driving sessions it should be holding air. Depending on rim/tire fit and tire condition, the process can be easier or harder. Oh, and if you are seeing sealant come out between rim and tire, it might seal but that's a bigger issue. From what I've read, higher tire pressure may be your only fix there. On bikes we sometimes build up the rim a bit with rim tape to push the tire into better position. It actually works quite well and don't see why it wouldn't work here. Often a millimeter is all that is needed.

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I've had some pretty impressive results with Slime, a couple that-should-have-worked moments as well. As cheap as it is relative to tires, I'd try it; worst case, you're cleaning (most of) it back out and putting tubes in, or replacing the tires, which is pretty well where you're at now.
 

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I run 44" swampers on my rig. Tread is like new but they're dry rotted pretty badly. They used to leak totally flat in a week. I pumped a half gallon of slime in each tire and drove it around the block and then took it out for a full day on the trails. They haven't leaked since. YMMV, my truck doesn't see street time.
 

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Maybe if you remove the half inch thread from the tires they will seal better. Is that like rope poked through it with a giant needle or bolts sticking through?

Ohhh, you meant tread, like the patterned rubber lugs on the surface of the tire, not thread!

In seriousness though, dunk the wheels&tires in a pond and watch for small bubbles coming up, that will tell you where the leaks are coming from. Or spray them down with a bottle of soapy water and watch for the same. Slime won't seal a wheel or a sidewall leak. It might do sidewalls if you lay the tires down sideways and gave them a slosh every now and then for a couple days, then turned them over and did the same to the other side.
 

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A mixture of shredded newspaper and antifreeze works great for tubeless tires that don't see any highway. Just make a slurry out of it pop a bead and put about a quart in. Works great for forklift tires and nail holes, lawn mower tires and tubeless implement tires. Sounds like BS but works wonders and if you use used antifreeze it costs nothing.
 

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If you search back I think guts were using fabric softener, in place of slime, irrc to seal bead locks. It is cheap and smells better.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the replies.
Regarding tubes, i have had a bad experience with general grabbers who suffered the same issue, because the inner steel wire would puncture them and cause a sudden blow, wich can cause a roll-over at street speeds.
I will give slime (or similar) a try, and see how it goes.
 

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It's common to use Liquid Starch in Sand paddle tires that leak down.
I use it on mine and I need to re add a bottle about once a year.
 

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I run 44" swampers on my rig. Tread is like new but they're dry rotted pretty badly. They used to leak totally flat in a week. I pumped a half gallon of slime in each tire and drove it around the block and then took it out for a full day on the trails. They haven't leaked since. YMMV, my truck doesn't see street time.
I had some old ass rotten 39 Iroks (like 2003-4 date codes), bald as shit and grooved to teh cords.

quart of slime in each and a spin down the road at 35psi, let it sit for a couple weeks then aired down to go wheelin.

That was 2 years ago and I hadn't touched the tires when I sold it.

There was big ol wet spots all over the tread and sidewalls from the slime leaching out. pretty cool
 

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If you search back I think guts were using fabric softener, in place of slime, irrc to seal bead locks. It is cheap and smells better.
i did that for a while, worked surprisingly well and was much cheaper than slime.

if using steel wheels, paint the inside of the wheels first
 

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If they have dry rot to the point they are leaking, I wouldn't be looking at them as street tires.
You're worried about blowouts and rollover at "street speeds" with a tube, but not old leaking tires?:homer:
 

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If they have dry rot to the point they are leaking, I wouldn't be looking at them as street tires.
You're worried about blowouts and rollover at "street speeds" with a tube, but not old leaking tires?:homer:
I'm honestly surprised it took someone this long to speak up. I wouldn't use those tires for anything more than a spare. And even then I'd be very apprehensive.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I am not very worried about the safety of the tyres because they look good, out and in the inside, not dry or rot, with only minor pores if you look at the tread with a magnifient lens. The sidewalls look new, Mall crawler tyre for sure.
The 6yo km2 i took from the rims before looked like absolut trash next to these ones, and they had no leaks.
The air leak is like 1psi a day, on all four's.
 

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I am not very worried about the safety of the tyres because they look good, out and in the inside, not dry or rot, with only minor pores if you look at the tread with a magnifient lens. The sidewalls look new, Mall crawler tyre for sure.
The 6yo km2 i took from the rims before looked like absolut trash next to these ones, and they had no leaks.
The air leak is like 1psi a day, on all four's.
So you've inspected them on the inside? No pokey bits to pop tubes?

I've seen more than a few old tube tires from tractors that had tire liners in them along with the tubes.

Tubes used to be a perfectly safe way to transport kids and nuns back in the day...

Do a submersion test on them to be sure about where they are leaking.
 
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